Simply Wonderful

Simply Wonderful

Fall is the most wonderful time of the year. It's a time of transition, changing leaves, rustic produce, and cozy nights by the fire. One of autumn's greatest offerings is the arrival of fresh, ruby red pomegranates. We're here to toast all things POM so that you, too, can enjoy the sweet burst of flavor and celebrate the season.

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POM 101

Fall

We've partnered with some of the country's most talented chefs and asked them to create dishes from fresh pomegranates in honor of the season. Here's who's on board. Fall is the most wonderful time of the year. It's a time of transition, changing leaves, rustic produce, and cozy nights by the fire. One of autumn's greatest offerings is the arrival of fresh, ruby red pomegranates. We're here to toast all things POM so that you, too, can enjoy the sweet burst of flavor and celebrate the season.

Q & A With Chef Molly McCook
As part of our annual POM Chefs Series, we are chatting with cooks about what makes fall so special to them, and how they use pomegranates in their everyday cooking. 
This week Molly McCook of Ellerbe Fine Foods is sharing her thoughts on her penchant for pumpkins and her love of a great pomegranate pilaf.
POM WONDERFUL: How would you describe your cooking style?
Molly McCook: My cooking style would be best described as seasonal, farm to table.  We are continually changing the menu at Ellerbe Fine Foods depending on the time of year and what our farmers have to offer.
What do you love about cooking during the fall?
I love the flavors and colors of fall. The flavors and smells are comforting and snuggly with beautiful jewel tones of orange and ruby.
What are some of your favorite fall fruits and veggies to work with?
I really enjoy working with gourds such as butternut squash and fairytale pumpkins. Also I love incorporating pomegranates into our fall dishes.  The crisp bright flavor of the arils gives great contrast as well as adding the juice to sauces for a surprising sweet element.
Other than your own restaurant, where do you like to dine?
We are always looking for the small authentic mom and pop restaurant.  I like all types of ethnic cuisine as it is always a real learning experience!
What chefs do you admire and why?
I admire any successful chef. In this industry, it takes much more than knowing how to just sauté to make an impact.  Their ways might not be mine, but there is always something to be learned from your fellow colleagues.
How do you work with pomegranates, either in the restaurant or at home? 
Pomegranates are such a versatile fruit. I use the arils in savory dishes to top salads or mix into rice pilafs. They are great to bake into your fall desserts as well. As a child, every fall my mother would dress me and my sister in our father’s old t-shirts and sit us on the back porch with fresh pomegranates to try our hand at picking the sweet arils ourselves as an afternoon snack!
Any simple tips for home cooks?
Don’t be afraid to try working with all the different fruits and vegetables of fall.  Experiment! They are at their peak for such a short amount of time, so really enjoy them.
Where is your dream vacation to take over the holiday break?
I would love to spend the holidays in Italy. I think the great cities such as Florence and Rome would be beautifully decorated and it would be fun to go to one of the ski towns in the north as well.
Posted October 21

Q & A With Chef Molly McCook

As part of our annual POM Chefs Series, we are chatting with cooks about what makes fall so special to them, and how they use pomegranates in their everyday cooking. 

This week Molly McCook of Ellerbe Fine Foods is sharing her thoughts on her penchant for pumpkins and her love of a great pomegranate pilaf.

POM WONDERFUL: How would you describe your cooking style?

Molly McCook: My cooking style would be best described as seasonal, farm to table.  We are continually changing the menu at Ellerbe Fine Foods depending on the time of year and what our farmers have to offer.

What do you love about cooking during the fall?

I love the flavors and colors of fall. The flavors and smells are comforting and snuggly with beautiful jewel tones of orange and ruby.

What are some of your favorite fall fruits and veggies to work with?

I really enjoy working with gourds such as butternut squash and fairytale pumpkins. Also I love incorporating pomegranates into our fall dishes.  The crisp bright flavor of the arils gives great contrast as well as adding the juice to sauces for a surprising sweet element.

Other than your own restaurant, where do you like to dine?

We are always looking for the small authentic mom and pop restaurant.  I like all types of ethnic cuisine as it is always a real learning experience!

What chefs do you admire and why?

I admire any successful chef. In this industry, it takes much more than knowing how to just sauté to make an impact.  Their ways might not be mine, but there is always something to be learned from your fellow colleagues.

How do you work with pomegranates, either in the restaurant or at home? 

Pomegranates are such a versatile fruit. I use the arils in savory dishes to top salads or mix into rice pilafs. They are great to bake into your fall desserts as well. As a child, every fall my mother would dress me and my sister in our father’s old t-shirts and sit us on the back porch with fresh pomegranates to try our hand at picking the sweet arils ourselves as an afternoon snack!

Any simple tips for home cooks?

Don’t be afraid to try working with all the different fruits and vegetables of fall.  Experiment! They are at their peak for such a short amount of time, so really enjoy them.

Where is your dream vacation to take over the holiday break?

I would love to spend the holidays in Italy. I think the great cities such as Florence and Rome would be beautifully decorated and it would be fun to go to one of the ski towns in the north as well.

Pomegranates Throughout History
Did you know that pomegranates are not only linked to Persephone but also to Aphrodite and Hera?
The pomegranate was sacred to Aphrodite who was said to have first planted it on the island of Kypros. The fruit symbolized female fertility. You can read more about the history of this gorgeous fruit here.
Posted October 21

Pomegranates Throughout History

Did you know that pomegranates are not only linked to Persephone but also to Aphrodite and Hera?

The pomegranate was sacred to Aphrodite who was said to have first planted it on the island of Kypros. The fruit symbolized female fertility. You can read more about the history of this gorgeous fruit here.

Baked Apple Cider Donuts With Pom Glaze
 It’s true that we are in love with healthy, seasonally-driven eats, but is there anything better than a freshly fried donut? Especially when they’re made with fantastic, fall-inspired POM glaze. 
These apple cider donuts with a POM glaze combine all of those lovely things, but are baked instead of fried. 
What’s great about this recipe is that they’re also vegan, meaning everyone can enjoy these delightful, festive fall treats. 
Here’s how it’s done via veganfoody:

Baked Apple Cider Donuts with Pomegranate Glaze
Posted October 17

Baked Apple Cider Donuts With Pom Glaze

 It’s true that we are in love with healthy, seasonally-driven eats, but is there anything better than a freshly fried donut? Especially when they’re made with fantastic, fall-inspired POM glaze. 

These apple cider donuts with a POM glaze combine all of those lovely things, but are baked instead of fried. 

What’s great about this recipe is that they’re also vegan, meaning everyone can enjoy these delightful, festive fall treats. 

Here’s how it’s done via veganfoody:

Baked Apple Cider Donuts with Pomegranate Glaze

Chef Sam Hazen
Executive Chef of Veritas New York
A lifetime of cooking in some of the world’s top restaurants prompted Chef Sam Hazen to return to his culinary roots. Born into a restaurant family and working in kitchens from an early age, he quickly discovered his dedication to great food made with superb ingredients sourced from local markets and trusted purveyors.
Hazen is a graduate of the Culinary Institute of America. His culinary career spans tenures at La Côte Basque, Quilted Giraffe, Quatorze Bis, Le Gavroche, Cascabel and Tavern on the Green. He also helped create two of the biggest restaurant triumphs in the country: TAO New York and TAO Las Vegas.
Posted October 16

Chef Sam Hazen

Executive Chef of Veritas New York

A lifetime of cooking in some of the world’s top restaurants prompted Chef Sam Hazen to return to his culinary roots. Born into a restaurant family and working in kitchens from an early age, he quickly discovered his dedication to great food made with superb ingredients sourced from local markets and trusted purveyors.

Hazen is a graduate of the Culinary Institute of America. His culinary career spans tenures at La Côte Basque, Quilted Giraffe, Quatorze Bis, Le Gavroche, Cascabel and Tavern on the Green. He also helped create two of the biggest restaurant triumphs in the country: TAO New York and TAO Las Vegas.

POM Point Reyes Deviled Eggs
By Sam Hazen, Veritas
Deviled eggs are just one of those classic dishes that we’ll never tire of. Chef Sam Hazen of Veritas put a fun twist on this old school app, making it with a bit of bleu cheese that pairs perfectly with the piquant pom arils. 
Here’s how it’s done.
Ingredients
POM Molasses:
3 cups juice from POM Wonderful Pomegranates (or 3 cups POM Wonderful 100% Pomegranate Juice)
1/4 cup sugar
juice from 1 lemon
Deviled Eggs:
2 tablespoons arils from POM Wonderful Pomegranates (or 2 tablespoons POM POMS Fresh Arils)
2 tablespoons POM Molasses
6 eggs
1/4 lb. Point Reyes blue cheese
1/4 cup mayonnaise
1 tablespoon mustard
1 tablespoon caper juice
1/2 tablespoon minced chives
salt and pepper to taste
Preparation
POM Molasses:
Prepare fresh pomegranate juice, if necessary.*
Combine pomegranate juice, sugar and juice from one lemon in a saucepan; bring to a simmer.
Reduce until a very thick syrup forms that can thickly coat the back of a spoon, then cool to room temperature.
*For 3 cups of juice, cut 6–9 large POM Wonderful Pomegranates in half and juice them with a citrus reamer or juicer. Pour the mixture through a cheesecloth-lined strainer or sieve. Set the juice aside.
Deviled Eggs:
Prepare fresh pomegranate arils, if necessary.**
Place eggs in a room-temperature pot.
Place water in another pot and bring to boil.
Pour boiling water over eggs and bring to simmer. Simmer for 11 minutes only.
Peel immediately under cold water.
Split in half and remove the yolks.
Pass yolks through an icing rack or tamis.
Place in a bowl and mix together with the mayonnaise, mustard, caper juice and minced chives. Season to taste.
**To prepare fresh arils, score 1 large POM Wonderful Pomegranate and place in a bowl of water. Break open the pomegranate under water to free the arils (seed sacs). The arils will sink to the bottom of the bowl and the membrane will float to the top. Sieve and put the arils in a separate bowl. Reserve 1⁄8 cup of the arils from fruit and set aside. (Refrigerate or freeze remaining arils for another use.)
To Assemble:
Fill egg white half with 1 tablespoon deviled egg filling and top with a sprinkling of blue cheese.
Drizzle POM Molasses on plate. Garnish each deviled egg with 1/2 teaspoon of arils.
Posted October 16

POM Point Reyes Deviled Eggs

By Sam Hazen, Veritas

Deviled eggs are just one of those classic dishes that we’ll never tire of. Chef Sam Hazen of Veritas put a fun twist on this old school app, making it with a bit of bleu cheese that pairs perfectly with the piquant pom arils. 

Here’s how it’s done.

Ingredients

POM Molasses:

3 cups juice from POM Wonderful Pomegranates (or 3 cups POM Wonderful 100% Pomegranate Juice)

1/4 cup sugar

juice from 1 lemon

Deviled Eggs:

2 tablespoons arils from POM Wonderful Pomegranates (or 2 tablespoons POM POMS Fresh Arils)

2 tablespoons POM Molasses

6 eggs

1/4 lb. Point Reyes blue cheese

1/4 cup mayonnaise

1 tablespoon mustard

1 tablespoon caper juice

1/2 tablespoon minced chives

salt and pepper to taste

Preparation

POM Molasses:

Prepare fresh pomegranate juice, if necessary.*

Combine pomegranate juice, sugar and juice from one lemon in a saucepan; bring to a simmer.

Reduce until a very thick syrup forms that can thickly coat the back of a spoon, then cool to room temperature.

*For 3 cups of juice, cut 6–9 large POM Wonderful Pomegranates in half and juice them with a citrus reamer or juicer. Pour the mixture through a cheesecloth-lined strainer or sieve. Set the juice aside.

Deviled Eggs:

Prepare fresh pomegranate arils, if necessary.**

Place eggs in a room-temperature pot.

Place water in another pot and bring to boil.

Pour boiling water over eggs and bring to simmer. Simmer for 11 minutes only.

Peel immediately under cold water.

Split in half and remove the yolks.

Pass yolks through an icing rack or tamis.

Place in a bowl and mix together with the mayonnaise, mustard, caper juice and minced chives. Season to taste.

**To prepare fresh arils, score 1 large POM Wonderful Pomegranate and place in a bowl of water. Break open the pomegranate under water to free the arils (seed sacs). The arils will sink to the bottom of the bowl and the membrane will float to the top. Sieve and put the arils in a separate bowl. Reserve 1⁄8 cup of the arils from fruit and set aside. (Refrigerate or freeze remaining arils for another use.)

To Assemble:

Fill egg white half with 1 tablespoon deviled egg filling and top with a sprinkling of blue cheese.

Drizzle POM Molasses on plate. Garnish each deviled egg with 1/2 teaspoon of arils.

Roasted Harvest Veggies With Coconut, POMs and Avocado
It’s no secret that we love all things served in bowls, especially harvest dishes that celebrate the season. 
This one includes fall veggies and a few of our other favorite Cali ingredients — pomegranates and avocados. 
Here’s how it’s done via intensefoodcravings:

Roasted Harvest Veggie, Curried Avocado + Coconut Rice Bowls
Posted October 16

Roasted Harvest Veggies With Coconut, POMs and Avocado

It’s no secret that we love all things served in bowls, especially harvest dishes that celebrate the season. 

This one includes fall veggies and a few of our other favorite Cali ingredients — pomegranates and avocados. 

Here’s how it’s done via intensefoodcravings:

Roasted Harvest Veggie, Curried Avocado + Coconut Rice Bowls

Loving this gorgeous illo for fall. We could almost see it framed on our wall!
Posted October 15

Loving this gorgeous illo for fall. We could almost see it framed on our wall!

(Source: girlinlondon, via girlinlondon)

POM Chef Q&A With Mat Schuster of Canela Bistro in SF
To celebrate the season, we’re talking to some of our favorite chefs to see what they enjoy most about fall.
First up, we had a chat with chef Mat Schuster of Canela Bistro & Wine Bar in San Francisco. We discussed his favorite autumn produce, where he dreams about traveling during the fall and winter months to get culinary inspiration, and how he uses pomegranates in his dishes.
POM: What are some of your favorite fall fruits and veggies to work with?  
Chef Mat Schuster: Personally, I love Jarradale pumpkin and love to roast it.  We work with a local farmer who brings me lots of them during the season.  I also like pomegranates — both using the seeds for salads, as well as juicing them for sauces. 
What do you love about cooking this time of year?  
Braises, stews, earthy flavors of fall, warm foods, rich sauces with tender meats…
How would you describe your cooking style?  
I think my style is a bit of a mash up, probably like many people.  I was actually just thinking about this because I went to see “100 Foot Journey” over the weekend.
I grew up in a Jewish family in Texas, so there are two strong culinary traditions right there. Then I spent a part of college in Rome and was later trained in a classic French style after I returned to the States.  Having lived in California for the past 14 years has definitely given me a love of our great produce, seafood, local meats and cheeses.  I have also been a student of Spanish cuisine for the past 9 years, having traveled there almost 20 times and learning recipes from family over there. So it’s definitely worldly and eclectic. 
How do you work with pomegranates, either in the restaurant or at home? Any simple tips for home cooks?  
One of my favorite things to do is juice them. I fell in love with this when I was in Israel.  We were in the open air markets and they were juicing them on the street directly into cups.  It was one of the most refreshing treats of the trip.  I still love to juice them and turn them into sauces, and even make a winter gazpacho.
Where is your dream vacation to take over the holiday break?  
It would be pretty amazing to go back to Tel Aviv and sip some fresh squeezed pomegranate juice at a cafe table on the beach with my feet dug into the sand!POM Chef Q&A With Mat Schuster of Canela Bistro in SF
To celebrate the season, we’re talking to some of our favorite chefs to see what they enjoy most about fall.
First up, we had a chat with chef Mat Schuster of Canela Bistro & Wine Bar in San Francisco. We discussed his favorite autumn produce, where he dreams about traveling during the fall and winter months to get culinary inspiration, and how he uses pomegranates in his dishes.
POM: What are some of your favorite fall fruits and veggies to work with?  
Chef Mat Schuster: Personally, I love Jarradale pumpkin and love to roast it.  We work with a local farmer who brings me lots of them during the season.  I also like pomegranates — both using the seeds for salads, as well as juicing them for sauces. 
What do you love about cooking this time of year?  
Braises, stews, earthy flavors of fall, warm foods, rich sauces with tender meats…
How would you describe your cooking style?  
I think my style is a bit of a mash up, probably like many people.  I was actually just thinking about this because I went to see “100 Foot Journey” over the weekend.
I grew up in a Jewish family in Texas, so there are two strong culinary traditions right there. Then I spent a part of college in Rome and was later trained in a classic French style after I returned to the States.  Having lived in California for the past 14 years has definitely given me a love of our great produce, seafood, local meats and cheeses.  I have also been a student of Spanish cuisine for the past 9 years, having traveled there almost 20 times and learning recipes from family over there. So it’s definitely worldly and eclectic. 
How do you work with pomegranates, either in the restaurant or at home? Any simple tips for home cooks?  
One of my favorite things to do is juice them. I fell in love with this when I was in Israel.  We were in the open air markets and they were juicing them on the street directly into cups.  It was one of the most refreshing treats of the trip.  I still love to juice them and turn them into sauces, and even make a winter gazpacho.
Where is your dream vacation to take over the holiday break?  
It would be pretty amazing to go back to Tel Aviv and sip some fresh squeezed pomegranate juice at a cafe table on the beach with my feet dug into the sand!
Notes 20
Posted October 15

POM Chef Q&A With Mat Schuster of Canela Bistro in SF

To celebrate the season, we’re talking to some of our favorite chefs to see what they enjoy most about fall.

First up, we had a chat with chef Mat Schuster of Canela Bistro & Wine Bar in San Francisco. We discussed his favorite autumn produce, where he dreams about traveling during the fall and winter months to get culinary inspiration, and how he uses pomegranates in his dishes.

POM: What are some of your favorite fall fruits and veggies to work with?  

Chef Mat Schuster: Personally, I love Jarradale pumpkin and love to roast it.  We work with a local farmer who brings me lots of them during the season.  I also like pomegranates — both using the seeds for salads, as well as juicing them for sauces. 

What do you love about cooking this time of year?  

Braises, stews, earthy flavors of fall, warm foods, rich sauces with tender meats…

How would you describe your cooking style?  

I think my style is a bit of a mash up, probably like many people.  I was actually just thinking about this because I went to see “100 Foot Journey” over the weekend.

I grew up in a Jewish family in Texas, so there are two strong culinary traditions right there. Then I spent a part of college in Rome and was later trained in a classic French style after I returned to the States.  Having lived in California for the past 14 years has definitely given me a love of our great produce, seafood, local meats and cheeses.  I have also been a student of Spanish cuisine for the past 9 years, having traveled there almost 20 times and learning recipes from family over there. So it’s definitely worldly and eclectic. 

How do you work with pomegranates, either in the restaurant or at home? Any simple tips for home cooks?  

One of my favorite things to do is juice them. I fell in love with this when I was in Israel.  We were in the open air markets and they were juicing them on the street directly into cups.  It was one of the most refreshing treats of the trip.  I still love to juice them and turn them into sauces, and even make a winter gazpacho.

Where is your dream vacation to take over the holiday break?  

It would be pretty amazing to go back to Tel Aviv and sip some fresh squeezed pomegranate juice at a cafe table on the beach with my feet dug into the sand!

Check out this stunner via food52:

The perfect result of boozy braising.
Spicy Cider Beer Braised Chicken Enchilada Tacos w/ Sweet Chili Apple-Pomegranate Salsa via Half-Baked Harvest
Check out this stunner via food52:

The perfect result of boozy braising.
Spicy Cider Beer Braised Chicken Enchilada Tacos w/ Sweet Chili Apple-Pomegranate Salsa via Half-Baked Harvest
Check out this stunner via food52:

The perfect result of boozy braising.
Spicy Cider Beer Braised Chicken Enchilada Tacos w/ Sweet Chili Apple-Pomegranate Salsa via Half-Baked Harvest
Check out this stunner via food52:

The perfect result of boozy braising.
Spicy Cider Beer Braised Chicken Enchilada Tacos w/ Sweet Chili Apple-Pomegranate Salsa via Half-Baked Harvest
Check out this stunner via food52:

The perfect result of boozy braising.
Spicy Cider Beer Braised Chicken Enchilada Tacos w/ Sweet Chili Apple-Pomegranate Salsa via Half-Baked Harvest
Notes 5530
Posted October 14

Check out this stunner via food52:

The perfect result of boozy braising.

Spicy Cider Beer Braised Chicken Enchilada Tacos w/ Sweet Chili Apple-Pomegranate Salsa via Half-Baked Harvest

Q&A With POM Chef Jason Santos
As part of our annual POM Chefs Series, we are chatting with cooks about what makes fall so special to them, and how they use pomegranates in their everyday cooking. This week Jason Santos of Abby Lane Food & Spirits is sharing his thoughts. 
How would you describe your cooking style?
I like to think that my style is uniquely creative, passionate and fun with a touch of finesse. I like to stay true to the ingredients and let them shine but like to have fun while doing it! Liquid nitrogen in a milkshake, anyone?
What do you love about cooking during the fall?
My favorite season is definitely the fall, by far! I love how the weather starts to change, and the style of food starts to get heartier and richer. I love that the holidays are on the way, and there is so much to do that has to do with food.
What are some of your favorite fall fruit and veggies to work with?
All of my favorite foods grow in the fall: apples, squashes and more. But my favorite has to be figs — very versatile, sweet and exciting to cook with. Who doesn’t love a fresh fig?
If you were given pomegranates on an episode of Hell’s Kitchen, how would you use them?
I would make a beautiful roast pork Wellington with a maple pomegranate glaze. Gordon Ramsay does love his Wellingtons and pork is more forgiving with temperature than beef, so there would be less chance of him saying, “It’s [expletive] rawwwww!”
What chefs do you admire and why?
One of my favorite chefs in the country is, of course, Chef Gordon Ramsay. I admire his standards, I love his straight to the point attitude, and his food is some of the best I have ever had. 
I also love Chef Ken Oringer. He is a good friend, and he is one of the most creative chefs in the country. His passion for food is very organic and he’s taught me that good is good, no matter what the food is, whether it is late night clams in Chinatown or a good peach in the summer, or a great piece of seared foie gras.
Any simple tips for home cooks using pomegranates this fall?
They are a wonderful ingredient packed with flavor and nutrients. In my opinion, they are under-utilized and they can make a dish go from good to great. 
I like to use fresh pomegranate arils on any salad as they add a great crunch. It’s a nice, creative touch that makes a beautiful presentation and makes any dish unique.
Posted October 14

Q&A With POM Chef Jason Santos

As part of our annual POM Chefs Series, we are chatting with cooks about what makes fall so special to them, and how they use pomegranates in their everyday cooking. This week Jason Santos of Abby Lane Food & Spirits is sharing his thoughts. 

How would you describe your cooking style?

I like to think that my style is uniquely creative, passionate and fun with a touch of finesse. I like to stay true to the ingredients and let them shine but like to have fun while doing it! Liquid nitrogen in a milkshake, anyone?

What do you love about cooking during the fall?

My favorite season is definitely the fall, by far! I love how the weather starts to change, and the style of food starts to get heartier and richer. I love that the holidays are on the way, and there is so much to do that has to do with food.

What are some of your favorite fall fruit and veggies to work with?

All of my favorite foods grow in the fall: apples, squashes and more. But my favorite has to be figs — very versatile, sweet and exciting to cook with. Who doesn’t love a fresh fig?

If you were given pomegranates on an episode of Hell’s Kitchen, how would you use them?

I would make a beautiful roast pork Wellington with a maple pomegranate glaze. Gordon Ramsay does love his Wellingtons and pork is more forgiving with temperature than beef, so there would be less chance of him saying, “It’s [expletive] rawwwww!”

What chefs do you admire and why?

One of my favorite chefs in the country is, of course, Chef Gordon Ramsay. I admire his standards, I love his straight to the point attitude, and his food is some of the best I have ever had. 

I also love Chef Ken Oringer. He is a good friend, and he is one of the most creative chefs in the country. His passion for food is very organic and he’s taught me that good is good, no matter what the food is, whether it is late night clams in Chinatown or a good peach in the summer, or a great piece of seared foie gras.

Any simple tips for home cooks using pomegranates this fall?

They are a wonderful ingredient packed with flavor and nutrients. In my opinion, they are under-utilized and they can make a dish go from good to great. 

I like to use fresh pomegranate arils on any salad as they add a great crunch. It’s a nice, creative touch that makes a beautiful presentation and makes any dish unique.